Archive | May 2016

Course Evaluations: How Can Should We Improve Response Rates? – Faculty Focus

Goodman, Anson, and Belcheir surveyed 678 faculty across a range of disciplines asking them to report how they were trying to boost online response rates. Among those surveyed, 13% reported that they did nothing to improve the rates and that, on average, 50% of their students completed the forms. Those who did something to encourage students to complete the evaluations generated response rates of 63%. The most common approaches faculty reported were the ones we’d expect.

Source: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/course-evaluations-can-improve-response-rates/

Survey: What Do the Latest Survey Results about Consumer Interest in Wearables Really Mean—for Providers? | Mark Hagland | Healthcare Blogs

The new study by analysts at PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PwC) that was released this past week offered fascinating survey results. The PwC folks had gathered 1,000 responses from U.S. consumers, carefully demographically adjusted to reflect certain characteristics of the U.S. population, specifically race, ethnicity, age, and gender.

Source: What Do the Latest Survey Results about Consumer Interest in Wearables Really Mean—for Providers? | Mark Hagland | Healthcare Blogs

Evaluating Online Nonprobability Surveys | Pew Research Center

As the costs and nonresponse rates of traditional, probability-based surveys seem to grow each year, the advantages of online surveys are obvious – they are fast and cheap, and the technology is pervasive. There is, however, one fundamental problem: There is no comprehensive sampling frame for the internet, no way to draw a national sample for which virtually everyone has a chance of being selected.

Source: Evaluating Online Nonprobability Surveys | Pew Research Center